Tag Archives: Wreath

Book Ends

This is a cool project alert! So clever and creative– not to mention really neat looking. I saw this in the lonby of the Marriott in downtown Milwaukee and was immediately lured to it, practically pushing aside hungover wedding party guests and moms yelling at their kids to get to it. From afar it looks like different sized blocks (which also would have been cool).

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But it’s not. It’s dissected books! And what a great way to make art out of something broken or ruined (because we wouldn’t use nice, new, books, right?!). But think of those books warped by water damage, or whose binds have broken or that are simply falling apart, (please avoid using valuable antique-y books…that would be a shame!) or westerns from the eighties that you have no earthy use for.

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I did not get close enough to see how this was attached but I can just envision that there is a strong circular rod in the middle and all you would have to do is drill a hole in your slice of book and stick it on the ring– so some power tools requires between a power saw and a drill. There may also be some glue involved. I wonder if this will work with a hanger!?

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If anyone out there has tried a similar project, please share! I may give it a go myself. I can imagine this might even be cool with magazine and catalogues. Stay tuned.

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Twelve Posts of Christmas–Take a Bough

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Let’s get out into nature and bring in some holiday cheer. With just a bit of effort and ingenuity, you can make a gorgeous evergreen bough for free.

What you will need: one wire hanger, twine or twist ties or thin gauge wire, evergreen snippets. And some ribbon and maybe some ornaments for those finishing touches. 20131214-170855.jpg

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Step 1) take your wire hanger and pull the bottom part straight down from the middle. Straighten the sides so they don’t jut as much. Take your hook and bend down until it forms a loop.

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Step 2) take some glue and wrap thin ribbon or thick twine around the loop. Let dry.
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Step 3) go outside. Find your spruces and your pines and your firs. Even your hollies. Cut some parts about four-five inches long. Careful to take small snips from each plant so you don’t defrock one entirely.

Step 4) starting at the bottom of the metal piece. Begin to layer your evergreen pieces, like shingles. Secure each piece separately before covering it with the next piece. You want the two sides to touch (no gap in the middle) but you can make adjustments as you go. Use your creativity and use your winter berries and twigs and birch bark, etc. Whatever you find in your yard. 20131214-171215.jpg
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Step 5) as you near the top, make sure your last piece is secured a little higher than the hanger end (so that it covers the loop slightly).

Step 6) to finish, tie a large bow or cluster of ornaments at the top.

Step 7) hang from on high and enjoy!

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Twelve Posts of Christmas– Easy Wreaths

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Who doesn’t like free? This easy wreath project is something that you can do in one hour (okay, maybe two hours) from start to finish, and you don’t have to buy anything.*There is no pattern. Just use what you have on-hand, from old t-shirts, to holey socks, to scrap fabric remnants. I chose reds and greens in varying shades because I thought I had enough of them. If you try this project, I would love to see what you come up with. I encourage you not to run out and buy fabric for this, though. Being creative with what you have and making it Christmas-y will be half the fun.

What you need: one wire hanger, and a pile of fabric. Odd and bits are fine. 20131207-133314.jpg
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Your pile of fabric will become strips There is no formula, really. I cut strips about an inch wide and any where from 4-6 inches long. Some of my pieces were a little longer or shorter because that was the fabric I had and I wanted to use it all up. I also learned that the thicker the fabric the thinner the strip. It was no problem. I just ended up cutting some strips in half to make knotting them a little easier. 20131207-141129.jpg

Stretch your hanger until it becomes a circle. It does not need to be perfect, just round. 20131207-134116.jpg

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For this wreath, I left the hook on, however you could snip the two sides beneath the hook and entwine the wire ends together. I left it on to use as its own hanging implement. You’ll see.

And now, take your strips and start tying knots.

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Yes, this step is a bit tedious. The good thing is that you really can’t screw up. I didn’t have enough scraps so I had to go back and cut more, but those were easily blended into the wreath because you can push your knots aside and insert new knots.

When you are done, I think you’ll be impressed with you own project. I embellished with a wire ribbon bow, but if I were a little less lazy, I would have raided my stash of ornaments.

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To hang, simply twist the hook 90 degrees to the back, and you can hang this over the door. If that doesn’t work for you, you can leave the hook as it was and bend it down into a loop. Use your glue of choice to cover the loop with fabric so it doesn’t look so much like a hanger. Now you can hang this from those over the door hooks or from a ribbon. You can also just snip the hook off, just remember where it is because that will be a sharp piece of wire. The fabric should hide the snipped wire. You can hang with a nice piece of ribbon through the wreath.

To see another cute idea using a wire hanger, click on this link.

As always, feel free to share this project. You know, post on Pinterest, Facebook, etc. Just click on links below or copy and paste this page.

*I am assuming you have or can easily acquire a wire hanger.